From Me to We

From Me to We: The Five Transformational Commitments Required to Rescue the Planet, your Organization, and your Life Bob Doppelt reveals that most people today live a dream world, controlled by false perceptions and beliefs. The most deeply held illusion is that all organisms on Earth, including each of us, exist as independent entities. At the most fundamental level, the change needed to overcome our misperceptions is a shift from focusing only on “me” – our personal needs and wants – to also prioritizing the broader “we”: the many ecological and social relationships each of us are part of, those that make life possible and worthwhile. Research shows that by using the techniques described in this book this shift is possible – and not that difficult to achieve.

From Me to We offers five transformational “commitments” that can help you change your perspective and engage in activities that will help resolve today’s environmental and social problems. Not coincidentally, making these commitments can improve the quality of your life as well.

Bob Doppelt’s latest book is a wake-up call to the creed of individualism. He calls for recognition of the laws of interdependence, cause and effect, moral justice, trusteeship, and free will. The book will be essential to all of those interested in how we can create and stimulate a sea change in how to enable the necessary behavioral change we need to deal with the myriad environmental and social pressures consuming the planet.

From Me to We
The Five Transformational Commitments Required to Rescue the Planet, your Organization, and your Life
Bob Doppelt
Greenleaf Publishing http://greenleaf-publishing.com/
180 pp | 234 x 156 mm | paperback

In From Me to We: The Five Transformational Commitments Required to Rescue the Planet, your Organization, and your Life, systems change expert Bob Doppelt reveals that most people today live a dream world, controlled by false perceptions and beliefs. The most deeply held illusion is that all organisms on Earth, including each of us, exist as independent entities. At the most fundamental level, the change needed to overcome our misperceptions is a shift from focusing only on “me” – our personal needs and wants – to also prioritizing the broader “we”: the many ecological and social relationships each of us are part of, those that make life possible and worthwhile. Research shows that by using the techniques described in this book this shift is possible – and not that difficult to achieve.

From Me to We offers five transformational “commitments” that can help you change your perspective and engage in activities that will help resolve today’s environmental and social problems. Not coincidentally, making these commitments can improve the quality of your life as well.

Bob Doppelt’s latest book is a wake-up call to the creed of individualism. He calls for recognition of the laws of interdependence, cause and effect, moral justice, trusteeship, and free will. The book will be essential to all of those interested in how we can create and stimulate a sea change in how to enable the necessary behavioral change we need to deal with the myriad environmental and social pressures consuming the planet.

Contents
Introduction

1 ‘Me’ to ‘We’ throughout history

2 The first commitment: See the systems you are part of

3 The second commitment: Be accountable for all the consequences of your actions

4 The third commitment: Abide by society’s most deeply held universal principles of morality and justice

5 The fourth commitment: Acknowledge your trustee obligations and take responsibility for the continuation of all life

6 The fifth commitment: Choose your own destiny

7 Conclusion: It is up to you

… From Me To We invites us to dig a little deeper into why it is that the system isn’t working, to interrogate the faulty philosophical “software” on which that system operates. … This is a thoughtful, timely and hugely significant contribution to today’s all-important politics of transformation.
Jonathon Porritt

The five transformative commitments described by Bob Doppelt in his engaging new book provide a much-needed and compelling set of first-order principles that can guide every organisation toward true sustainability.
Hunter Lovins

Doppelt’s book effectively connects individual change and action to the global solution. Indeed, individual action and change must happen before the climate crisis can be solved globally.
Bill Bradbury, Former Oregon Secretary of State; Commissioner, Northwest Power and Conservation Planning Council

High time we broke free from the I-dolatry of the high consumer era, and started thinking about the community. This book points a way down that path.
Bill McKibben, author of Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet

Bob has a knack for simplifying complexities. His five commitments reframe prerequisite personal and organisational mind-sets for the journey toward a sustainable environment, society and economy … They deserve to be on tablets of stone.
Bob Willard, author of The Sustainability Advantage

In Bob Doppelt’s new book he eloquently charges us to take the moral responsibility to join together, to use the power of “we”, to address the climate crisis we face. And he tells us how to get there, and how to do it right now.
Kitty Piercy, Mayor, City of Eugene; Former Minority Leader of the House of Representatives

… this book makes an important contribution to our most civilization-challenging problems.
Donald A. Brown, Associate Professor of Environmental Ethics, Science, and Law, Penn State University

This book is a valuable resource for individuals, communities and organisations serious about preserving and sustaining life on our Earth.
Luisa M. Saffiotti, PhD, President, Psychologists for Social Responsibility, USA

Bob Doppelt brings welcome clarity and insight to the sustainable development debate … With Doppelt’s five commitments we now have a compass with which to navigate towards a more sustainable future.
Dr Wayne Visser, CEO, CSR International; Senior Associate, Cambridge University

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The Future Is Already Here Marvin Weisbord

The Future Is Already Here
by adminmarvinblog on Dec 22, 2011 • 2:00 pm
The Future Is Already Here

Do you know Frederick Taylor? He was born in 1856, four years before the Civil War and died in 1915, a year after World War I began in Europe. He was the world’s first management consultant. Peter Drucker, the management guru, said Taylor shaped the modern world as much as Karl Marx or Sigmund Freud. I start this blog with Taylor because of the way his life shaped mine. He was a Philadelphian like me. Well, not exactly like me. I grew up in a West Philly row house. He lived in a Chestnut Hill mansion. I followed him as a consultant into Bethlehem Steel 80 years after he left. I found myself full of empathy for him, just as you may when you know learn more about him (Chapters 3 and 4).

Today, talking with Dorothy (to whom I dedicated this PW edition), I found a theme for my blog that enabled me to start writing. I intend for this space to be a meditation and a dialogue on what Rupert Sheldrake, the molecular biologist, called “the presence of the past.” I had the good fortune to manage and consult during the early years of a second workplace revolution that included computers, group dynamics, and a million ways to improve yourself. I knew many workplace pioneers. I have some good stories about where stuff we take for granted came from—e.g. participation, leadership styles, strategic planning, and the subtle dance we do with economics and technology. I know stories about herculean development projects in iconic organizations that no longer exist. (That’s a topic for another day.) I see myself as a link between those who pioneered ideas and methods shaping our work lives and those who are shaping the future of the work world now. I mean you.

I’ll lead off with an observation so obvious I wish I’d learned it in grade school. I know now that in some cultures people have known it for thousands of years. Since I live only in my culture, it’s taken me until now to say in a sentence or two what I learned during 50 years of managing, consulting, researching and teaching. The future never comes, it’s already here. (That’s Chapter 26 in the book.) Everything happens in the present. The past shapes our behavior now. The future exists in our heads now. The future arrives one nano-second at a time and fades in an eye-blink into the past. The dream that just came true is now a memory. You’re already history. It took me 50 years to digest that enough to write about it. I trust you and your descendants will add to this story until the cyber-cloud disappears into…well…some other cloud.

What are the implications for the way we use economics and technology to foster life values of dignity, meaning and community? It’s doing the best you can with what you have every minute of every day. You can only change your world one meeting at time. So make today’s meeting—in whatever room you find yourself—the world you want to live in. If you try that, you may find you may find you have to do something you never did before. Use this space to tell what happened. The world is waiting, and so am I.

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Mandela–an Evolved Perspective

An interesting perspective concerning one whom many of us think as evolved:
http://www.tompeters.com/dispatches/what_toms_reading/
Tom Peters posted this on 08/16 | Permalink
A Book Worthy of Your Time & Attention
Mandela’s Way: Fifteen Lessons on Life, Love, and Courage, by Richard Stengel (Stengel, now editor of Time magazine, was a confidant of Mandela’s.)
From “Look the Part”:
“[Mandela has beautiful posture. You will never see him hunched over with his head anything but upright and looking ahead. On Robben Island, he was always aware of how he walked and carried himself. He knew he needed to be seen as standing up to the authorities, literally and figuratively … He knew that people took their cues from him, and if he were confident and unbowed, they would be too.”
“[Mandela] understood the power of image. … ‘Appearances constitute reality,’ he once told me.”
“In the election in 1994, his smile was the campaign. That smiling iconic campaign poster—on billboards, on highways, on street lamps, at tea shops and fruit stalls. It told black voters that he would be their champion and white voters that he would be their protector. It was the smile of the proverb ‘tout comprendre, c’est tout pardoner’—to understand is to forgive all. It was political Prozac for a nervous electorate.”
“Ultimately the smile was symbolic of how Mandela molded himself. At every stage of his life he decided who he wanted to be and created the appearance–and then the reality–of that person. He became who he wanted to be.”
From “Have a Core Principal—Everything Else Is Tactics”
“Nelson Mandela is a man of principle—exactly one: Equal rights for all, regardless of race, class, or gender. Pretty much everything else is a tactic. I know this seems like an exaggeration—but to a degree very few people suspect, Mandela is a thoroughgoing pragmatist who was willing to compromise, change, adapt, and refine his strategy as long as it got him to the promised land.”
From “See the Good in Others”* [*One of the best essays I have ever read.]
“Some call it a blind spot, others naïveté, but Mandela sees almost everyone as virtuous until proven otherwise. He starts with an assumption you are dealing with him in good faith. He believes that, just as pretending to be brave can lead to acts of real bravery, seeing the good in other people improves the chances that they will reveal their better selves.”
“Mandela … consciously chose to err on the side of generosity. By behaving honorably, even to people who may not deserve it, he believes you can influence them to behave more honorably than they otherwise would. This sometimes proved to be a useful tactic, particularly after he was released from prison, when his open, trusting attitude made him appear to be a man who could rise above bitterness. When he urged South Africans to ‘forget the past,’ most of them believed that he had. This had a double effect: It made whites trust Mandela more and it made them feel more generous toward the people they had so recently oppressed.”
“Mandela sees the good in others both because it is in his nature and in his interest. At times that has meant being blindsided, but he has always been willing to take that risk. And it is a risk. … Mandela goes out on a limb and makes himself vulnerable by trusting others. … We rarely equate risk with trying to see what is decent, honest, and good in the people in our daily lives. … ‘People will feel I see too much good in people, and I’ve tried to adjust because whether it is so or not, it is something I think is profitable. It’s a good thing to assume, to act on the basis that others are men of integrity and honor, because you need to attract integrity and honor. I believe in that.'”

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Joseph George on John Scherer’s Five Questions

The following was posted on the 14th July 2011 by Joseph George at http://groupsarelife.blogspot.com/2011/07/five-questions-that-john-scherer-poses.html
I recently wrote a blog http://www.energizeengage.com/profiles/blogs/model-organisation on implications of designing for organizational effectiveness. It was a nascent attempt to know how readers may take to the blog space for such a topic. At least two senior professionals in my field of passion, who’ve spent more years reading organizations than blogs thought it was a decent attempt. One of them, Terrence Seamon wrote that it may also imply if people from the field of Organisation Development ask enough questions. Do we ask enough questions irrespective of field we come from? My thought streams began this way, until I realized that it is after a certain point of quantity that the questions we ask would become questions of pertinence. Questions that are pertinent and persistent are the most powerful ones. I bring you a book review about questions that fall in that sweet spot between pertinence and persistence. The book is “Five Questions That Change Everything – Life Lessons at Work” by John J. Scherer (Bibliocast, 2009).

When evolutionary biologist Elisabet Sahtouris contributes a foreword, Mark Victor Hansen of the Chicken Soup Series writes a recommendation, there’s got to be a higher reason that John unites them in, beyond the biology of the birds and the bees. So as Sahtouris claims “science taught as mechanistic reductionism in which all life is seen blindly evolving mechanism”, this book looks at human beings as part of a co-creative force in a cosmic perspective. Many of us who come to this moment from the unquestioned assumption of science serving the guiding post in human affairs, have also seen the transformation of science serving ‘practical’ marketplace economics. That ‘practicality’ consumed India with linen for the cardamom pod in one era, and makes China the global factory today for almost anything in living memory.

So what would such a perspective of life giving or life-affirming dimension be? It could be your GPS. No, not your geo-positioning system; but your Greater Purpose Statement. That comes about in an intuitive joining of dots from the author’s own life. John has bared much to let his thoughts merge into that of the reader’s from a framework of 5 simple Questions. They are as below, and sequenced as such in the book’s plan:
1. What confronts me?
2. What am I bringing?
3. What runs me?
4. What calls me?
5. What will unleash me?

Irrespective of which part of the world we wake up to the sun from, John’s sharing casts light on your shadow too. His premise is surprisingly simple. He considers the workplace as the system that needs to be lived into by inviting us to be our authentic selves in relationship with others there. With a worldly immersion between Kenya’s Merreushi community of the Masai tribe, Poland’s contemporary industry professionals, the US Navy and deep learning from Masters of human processes in the USA (I can’t stop counting how many well-wishers he has there), and countless moments in various ports of call, John carves out a distinct self-perpetuating inquiry code necessary for life. Riveting text comes with portions of autobiographical narration, which however, every reader may not take to as spontaneously.

For me Chapter One on Facing the Tiger (read What Confronts me?) is an appeal to courage and possibility. To quote John “If you are not facing one of your tigers, it is already eating you”. Now for a moment again, we may dismiss the obvious metaphor saying we’ve led the tiger to near extinction in the physical world. In a racy society of materialistic oomph, consciousness may slip such a metaphor too to its extinction. Yet, in a curiously symbiotic way, I wish to see the tiger live and face it before the force of the metaphor itself dwindles out. Chapter Five begins dealing with the Question ‘What runs me?’ Living life on automatic is a very kinesthetic symbol, that John reminds us to be wary of. Whose life is one living with all the inner world perspective we shore inside in the tides of change? John takes us through a conversational trip on how we unwittingly carry themes that we enslave ourselves to – the Positive, Immediate and Concrete (PICs) and the ones we get less often – the Negative Immediate Concrete lessons (NICs). Our default pre-conscious leads us to a selective interpretation in our conscious state, John argues. In that conscious state we act as we choose to, depending on our addictions (PICs) and terrors (NICs). Not a question one will forget or have answered as in ‘forever’.

That is when we begin to be shown to the power of our shadows (our ignored selves). The book’s magic also comes through with the active use of Polarity Management as a discipline in thinking through issues and teasing problems to be solved from polarities to be managed. For readers not hungry enough to visualize who they seem to be becoming, this part of the book can do no more than tickle their curiosity. The constructive part of the book comes from the dealing of the remaining 2 questions. And this becomes the difficult part for the reader who has been used to a human face to such personal growth questions. That is where John’s triple pulls of Self, Others and Cause is a useful framework to our identity. Overexposing oneself to any one pull in the trio could diminish the other two. In Chapter 18, comes a set of deep bone questions. Sample these “What deep need does the world have that you would give anything to see met or addressed? What is something you deeply want to see happening in the world three generations from now because you had been alive..?.” That is how John takes us to his construct of the Greater Purpose Statement that integrates your Charism, Your Shadow Stretches and Your Impossible Possibility- The so That.

His last Question “What will unleash me” is about dealing with Pain and Possibility as parents of Transformation. Eventually chaos is the birth canal through which human evolution is presumed, true to Sahtouris’ preface. John has shown a deeply experienced promise in narrating the movement from living life on an ‘automatic’ to living authentically. Given that leadership is now increasingly seen as a process between members who enjoy the choice; this book is a consistent companion in process. For those who want a self-help manual, this is a tough read. For, as John writes of the workplace, “Your faculty is always there – the ones you like and the ones you can’t stand. ….the ones you don’t particularly like are the most important ones for your development”. Ever thought about that one? 311 pages long, it may take some a lifetime to complete reading. But as those questions change everything by brining one back to oneself, our personal ‘home’; it is one I’d like to have in hard copy than browse on an electronic screen. John’s punch in such contribution comes from sharing how his own statements look like and even baring the purpose of his book from the questions he asks. That is not an ordinary feat to pose as premise of a book! The essential question then is “What am I becoming?”

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A new beginning

With the blog in working order once again, all seems ripe to begin anew to explore evolutionary development as seen, thought about and aspired to in everyday life. How these thoughts will unfold here remains to be seen as this next part of the journey begins with its first step.

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New Systems of Governance Emerging

The deToqueville hypothesis that “democracy eventually prevails in all spheres of human activity” was at one time considered to be not only unquestionably true but the ‘gold ring’ or pinnacle of human endeavor. In this century, even as it appears that democracy in its present form in the US cannot address the growing nature and numbers of complex issues, new systems of governance are evolving. Organizations are deliberately pushing their edges and leveraging shifts toward more generative ‘systems of governance’ that broaden the constructs of inclusivity, deeper unity of purpose, imagination, engagement, participation politically and economically within foundations of respect, care and well-being for their own constituencies and the broader context. The models evolving to construct new social realities and to increase organizational capacity move well beyond the political as distribution of power into the relational, economic and higher order realms. As organizations develop their own meaningful intentionally constructed reality, transformational effects can be seen in the expanding capacities to apply imaginative intelligence for and by collaboration, deep connection, consensus, and engagement with higher order meaning and values.

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Convert Acceleration, Angle and Area Units

 

Equation (4.8) is Euler’s equation for motion of a fluid. It is a helpful equation in every unit of the conversion process. To convert acceleration, angle or area units, you may not to utilize the Euler’s equation one day. It shows that the acceleration is equal to the change in piezometric pressure with distance, which can be used to convert acceleration units and the minus sign means that the acceleration is in the direction of decreasing piezometric pressure.

 

In a static body of fluid, Euler’s equation reduces the need to convert area units applied to the hydrostatic differential equation, Eq. (3.5). In a static fluid, there are no viscous stresses, which is a condition required in the derivation of Euler’s equation to convert angle units. Also there is no motion, so the acceleration is zero in all directions. Thus, Euler’s equation reduces to ∂/∂ℓ(p + γz) = 0, which yields Eq. (3.4).

 

Euler’s equation can be applied to find the angle distribution across streamlines in rectilinear flow and to convert angle units. Consider the flow with parallel streamlines adjacent a wall shown in Fig. 4.12. In the direction normal to the wall, the ndirection, the acceleration is zero. Applying Euler’s equation in the n direction gives ∂/∂n(p + γz) = 0, so the piezometric pressure is constant in the normal direction.

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Modoo Marble تتنافس فى خطف اللاعبين من WOLFTEAM & NFS WORLD

كان مواطنا مثاليا يطيع القانون ولكنه انضم الى العصابات بسبب انه لم يستطيع حماية زوجته وطفله من الاعتداء الوحشى عليهم, يكره الشرطة للغاية وهذا سبب شراستى الكبيرة يتمنى لو يستطيع تمزيقهم لذلك قرر الانضمام للتجربة التى ستحولة الى ذئب لا يقهر فقط لمحبى online fps games نقدم لعبة WOLFTEAM ARABIC  من هنا http://ar.joygame.com/wolfteam/ اللعبة الافضل على الاطلاق فى العاب اطلاق النيران والمواجهة المباشرة, واجهة WOLFTEAM تعتبر من اسهل الواجهات فى التعامل معها فقط حاول تطوير من سرعتك ودقتك فى اطلاق النيران لتفوز فى WOLFTEAM, منذ تسعينات القرن الماضى ونحن نعشق العاب سباقات السيارات NEED FOR SPEED لذلك حرصت Joygame على تقديم اخر وأحدث اصدارات اللعبة NFS WORLD لنتيح للجميع سهولة الوصول الى اللعبة وتجربتها والاستمتاع بها فهى مختلفة كليا عن العاب سباقات السيارات المعتادة لان فى NFS WORLD خصومك هم لاعبيين من حول العالم فسوف تجد المهارة العالية والاصرار على الفوز http://ar.joygame.com/need-for-speed-world/ وستجد ايضا العديد من السيارات المعدلة بطرق مميزة جدا فى NFS WORLD. اعتمدت لعبة بنك الحظ على التجمعات العائلية وكانت مرتبطة دائما بوجود الاصدقاء او العائلة فى مكان واحد ولكننا استطعنا الوصول الى حل لهذا الموضوع, استمتع بلعبة بنك الحظ Modoo Marble عن طريق موقع الالعاب الاونلاين جوى جيم الموقع الاول فى الشرق الاوسط, يمكنك لعب Modoo Marble مع الاصدقاء او العائلة عن طريق الانترنت فقط سجل وحمل Modoo Marble ثم استمتع بها http://ar.joygame.com/land/modoo-marble/ , فالفوز فى اللعبة ليس مضمونا نهائيا لانه ليس لديك منافس واحد ولكن بقدرتك يمكنك التميز.

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At the outset, it might seem offputting that the Tea Party and new forms of governance using collaborative consensual decision making processes are emerging concurrently. The idea might even seem paradoxical until, on a second loop and third loop glance it can seen that the view this movement has of itself reflects a pinnacle of human achievement being transcended—that individual freedom was possible was long debated, now the debate involves the common good, the common ground of being—the common vision in government. Perhaps in US constitutional terms, the discussion has moved from freedom to equality.

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Welcome to the Evolutionary Development Blog!!

River in Vermont

This blog begins in the spirit of adventure and exploration of the unknown—to give figure and ground to ideas and thoughts.  A few will germinate, take  root, evolve and grow in this virtual milieu that does the work of sun and rain.  The blog begins as a new journey even as I prepare the completion for another—my research and writing that began with Bill Carris’ bold effort  described in his *Long Term Plan* for the Carris Companies 100% shared ownership and governance.  Information pertaining to the research and its publication is updated regularly within this site.

The blog postings involve ideas coming from thoughts, life and reading that don’t directly relate to that work in progress (at least at first breath) and which seem to deserve more reflection.  Some of the sharings may well be just personal tics and observations–others may be  an extension of thoughts, questions and moments of wondering.

Your comment will create an interaction—a dialogue—for the exploration and  no doubt round out what is posted here.

Thank  you.

Best,

Cecile

It may be that when we no longer know what to do,
we have come to our real work,
and when we no longer know which way to go,
we have begun our real journey.
– Wendell Berry, American farmer, poet, novelist and essayist

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